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Author Topic: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install  (Read 175 times)

gingersnap4x4

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My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« on: October 03, 2019, 06:33:35 PM »

This write up is intended to provide some good photos and general guidance for your installation. It reflects my personal experience with my personal rig. Keep in mind that your rig is your own, and you may have different challenges than I did. Due to post limits, I will break this write into sections.

At time of writing, some of the information I needed wasn't readily available. Myron was really on top of helping me fit and fix my junk, even calling me on his day off before hitting the trail. This guide is intended to fill some gaps, with clear photos. If you have more questions even after looking through this, feel free to reach out to me for a question about my specific write up, or ZOR for your own builds that arenít clearly laid out here.

Here are the usual warnings: Boost can damage engines, you should be careful installing boost onto a motor, Iím not responsible if you have motor damage, ZOR does not extend any warranties based on my write up. To be totally transparent, I didnít even tell them I was doing this and I donít expect them to honor my advice as anything other than some guy on the internet. Bottom line: Your rig is yours, and if you brick it, itís still yours.

Ok, on to the thing weíre all here for, the write up! I will put as much detail as I can into this. Some brief info about my rig. I decided to do a full rebuild on my motor when I decided to boost it. ZOR said that most people had best success with 9.5:1 compression ratio pistons. This makes sense, as some general research on the turbo in question (VW K03, found on some GTI models) is run with 9.5:1 from the VW Factory. ZOR strongly advises you to NOT run boost on a rebuilt motor. Break it in before boosting, I chose to follow that advice. Not included in my write up is the rebuild, or the piston swapping which I did myself. I will start with a motor that is assembled and running. I also relocated my battery into the rear cargo space, in order to open up room for the turbo kit and a future snorkel. This write up encompasses my full experience, including having to redo a lot of things that I didnít plan well enough the first time.

Parts in the kit are not labeled. It is up to you to figure out what each part, line, bolt, plate, and clamp is for. This was a huge source of frustration for my build, and I will do my best to help you get a general idea of what you need for what.

As for the installation, I will break my write up into sections. Exhaust, Intake/Carb, Fuel, Oil Feed/Drain, Gauges, Turbo/Charge Pipes, and Tuning. I would advise reading through all of this, and deciding what order you want to do things in. I did some stuff differently due to rebuilding the motor before boosting.


Some things I would strongly advise having on hand aside from what is provided in the kit:

Teflon pipe tape. Use this on any oil or coolant fitting that you are removing or replacing. It saves you a headache later down the road, and a $4 roll is a decent way to help ensure you avoid any leaks.
Extra rubber line and appropriate hose clamps. Since youíre already balls deep in your motor, may as well replace all the worn out fuel and coolant lines and clamps. If your rig is like mine, it has a ton of miles on it, and some of those hoses fell apart when you looked at them too hard.
A good assortment of new metric hardware. I got a couple of the OíShittyís house brand assorment boxes. Came with a selection of common bolts, nuts, washers, and lock washers. I used a lot more than I expected, as I had several bolts break on removal.
RTV. Black, Blue, Grey, and the Copper Exhaust stuff. Since I did a full rebuild, I got a little deeper than most people will. That being said, if youíve already committed to a $2k investment to boost your Samurai, may as well fix up a few other things. If I hadnít rebuilt my motor, I would have put on a new water pump, thermostat, etc. As Iím sure the rest of you tuners have experienced, thereís always some extra step you didnít plan on. Hedge your bets, get some RTV. The Copper stuff is, frankly, the best $7 I spent on this build.
If you donít have them, Allen Key bits. I got a local parts brand strip that goes on a ratchet set. Specifically, you will need an 8mm key, and a 6mm key to mount the turbo and return line. A set of ratcheting wrenches is also a helper. If possible, get an 8mm key and cut it off fairly short, as one bolt that goes from the manifold to the turbo is a very tight fit.
New Valve Cover Gasket. ZOR Recommends checking head bolt torque, which should be 55ft-lbs. If the cover is coming off, may as well replace it. Itís a relatively cheap gasket.
Heat shield tape. I taped up everything near the turbo. Brake master cylinder, lines, linkages, etc. The turbo gets very hot, and itís worth covering your ass.
Plenty of beer, and a good friend. The beer is obviously optional, but having an extra set of hands really speeds this up. Wrangling the feed and drain lines is annoying alone, and itís really nice to not run between the cab and carb to adjust the A/F mix.

Things that ZOR advises you have and does not provide:

An A/F meter with wideband O2 Sensor. This is critical for tuning the motor once youíve got it running again. I chose to get an Autometer analog gauge with a Bosch sensor. The Autometer came with everything I needed.
Boost gauge. Another sensor great for tuning your rig. ZOR sets the wastegate at 5psi at 3500ft Altitude. I live and wheel at ~6200ft and have seen 5psi at peak thus far.
Colder spark plugs. I got NGK Iridium plugs. I also got new wires, rotor, and cap.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2019, 06:34:25 PM »

EXHAUST:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/WIzktQH

I would recommend starting with the removal of the stock exhaust. There is no provision to mount the turbo setup to the factory system. You will have to do everything custom past the downpipe. The downpipe comes separately from the flange to mount to the turbo. You will have to weld it on yourself. My downpipe wasnít quite cut to mate up to the flange perfectly. The flange has a nominal inside diameter of 2.5in. The pipe is an aluminized steel with a nominal inside diameter of 2.5in. Iím planning to redo my exhaust with 2.75in pipe from flange back, as a 2.75in pipe will fit over the edge of the flange, and allows some porting to flow better.

My ZOR exhaust header was not lined up perfectly. The stock ports on the head are rectangles, and the flange has rectangular holes. The pipes are round. All of my ports had some amount of the pipe blocking flow. The number two cylinder was the worst. I chose to port match it better, using my dremel and a tungsten carbide bit. I hogged out the biggest sections with that, and then used a sturdy grinding stone to smooth everything down. I did run without the porting for awhile, and chose to do it recently as I was removing the exhaust for other reasons.

To weld your downpipe, I advise that you hand thread the mounting bolts for the turbo onto the manifold, and start the manifold onto the head. Hold it on with the nuts for the studs, hand thread the downpipe flange on, and then line up your downpipe. If possible, tack weld the pipe in a few spots from the top, then remove the system, take the flange and tacked pipe off, and finish welding. Once itís welded, I would mock it all up again, and plan out the rest of your exhaust system. Remove the exhaust until you have finished lining up and mounting the oil feed and return for your turbo. While it is off, wrap your downpipe with the provided exhaust wrap. Be careful and wear gloves/long sleeves. Those splinters hurt a shit ton.

Once your oil feed and return are set up, mount the turbo onto the manifold. Itís much easier to do this while the manifold is out of the engine bay. I spread the copper exhaust RTV on both sides of the gasket, then hand started the bolts. Then I tightened them down using the allen key and a wrench. There was one bolt that I had to use channel locks to finish out. Each bolt has two little locking washers on it.

ZOR provides new exhaust studs. Theyíre very nice, and high quality. Replace the OEM studs, RTV the provided Exhaust gasket, and put it all together. Torque down appropriately.

I chose to install my O2 Sensor before bolting up the down pipe. Set up your downpipe, and install the bolts. I used the same method as I did the turbo, using the bit and a wrench. These bolts also have two locking washers each. My O2 wire was long enough to use the OEM O2 Sensor wire wrap. Ideally, you have already finished mounting gauges and are able to plug it in now.

Before mounting the exhaust manifold, or at least the turbo, make sure you have the oil feed set up properly. I did this by running the motor, once fully assembled, without the exhaust on. The oil restrictor was fully shut, and I opened it until I had about 1 drip per second, and then another Ĺ turn open per ZOR instruction. Shut the motor off, make sure the motor has enough oil in it, and then hook up the manifold, turbo, feed and drain lines. Prime the turbo by disconnecting the distributor, cranking the motor for ten seconds, wait twenty, crank another ten, and then fire the engine up. More on that in the Turbo Section.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2019, 06:35:22 PM »

INTAKE/CARB:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/nvI09zv

The ZOR Directions for the Harley Carb install are pretty good. My main struggles were with the lack of information on which fuel line went where. Iíve tried to include generous photos of how my fuel system is plumbed to help you figure out how you plan to route yours. For those who have spent more time fiddling with carbs and motorcycles, this may be easier than it was for me.
One oddball thing I had to do for my rig, was break off this small vacuum plug. It appears to be some sort of coolant actuated piece that is unneeded with the new carb. The plug in the manifold is solid, so there is no coolant leakage. As with any oil or coolant fitting I touched on this build, I wrapped the thread with teflon pipe tape.

Another issue I ran into, my idle adjustment screw had no provision to lock it down. On a test run, it rattled down and set my idle at about 4k RPM. Real pain in the ass to get around the block when you canít throttle down. I replaced my screw with an Allen head bolt and a spring to hold it in place. This has worked perfectly for me. I got the bolt from the local Ace by taking the provided screw down and matching it. I got a few springs of different lengths to insure it would stay in place, regardless of how much adjustment I needed on my rig.

Finding a home for the cable choke and a way to get it through the firewall can be irritating as well. Iíve included photos on how I routed mine and where I placed it in the cab.

ZOR recommends capping off the vacuum advance on the distributor. The distributor has both vac advance and mechanical. With the turbo, under a boost condition, the vac advance would be pressurized and not function properly. The mechanical advance works perfectly once you have your base timing set right. ZOR advises no more than 6 degrees BTDC.

I capped off most of the vacuum ports on the intake manifold as well. Many of them are used for emissions, or tie into the stock carb set up. There are two small ports on the front end of the manifold that I used to tie the boost gauge and blow off whistle into.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2019, 06:35:58 PM »

FUEL:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/DOcjA24

Oh boy, here we go. The fuel system was one of the hardest things to plumb and figure out for me. I would advise picking up an extra few feet of the appropriate diameter rubber fuel line and a half dozen hose clamps. This is a really good time to replace all the worn out hoses on your rig.

ZOR recommends mounting the fuel pump on the frame, using some quality self tapping screws or drilling and bolting the mounting plate down. The filter they provide has a mounting band that fits well on the frame nearby. Iíve included a photo that Myron sent me when I inquired about the mounting.

I chose to mount mine differently, as I intend to change my stock gas tank out for something else in future. I placed my pump on the back of the floor pan behind the passenger seat, on the underside of the chassis. With some quality rubber washers and tight bolts, it is quiet enough for me. The hose clamps and thick foam do an excellent job of mounting the pump securely. My only warning about the pump is to be careful tightening the bolts for the contacts. I had one sheer off with minimal torque. Mainly bad luck, so just watch yourself. I had enough stud left to mount the contact, and secure it with some solid gaff tape. You can see where I placed my pump, and how I ran my filter(s). I grounded the pump on the frame, tied into a bolt that holds the factory fuel hardlines. I ran the power into the cab to a 20amp on/off switch from Painless, and ran the power with an inline fuse into a connecter that is powered when the key is in the ĎONí position.

Tapping into the stock fuel tank is a real bitch, plain and simple. With the stock towbar on my rig, and the clapped out 30yr old bolts, it was nigh impossible to lower the tank more than a couple inches. If possible, I advise lowering the tank as much as possible, and doing so with an empty tank, since even just a couple gallons of gas makes it heavier and doesnít lend itself to smooth lowering as the liquid shifts. An alternative, for those who have chopped up buggies, cut open the rear floor pan and go from the top.

I could not get a clean photo of where to route feed and return lines for the gas. I will describe them as best I can.

There is a very long length of large fuel line included in the kit. This is your gas return line, it runs from the pressure regulator to the tank, and recycles the fuel not going to the carb. According to Myron, ZORís owner and founder, the fuel pump is a 70 gallon/hour pump. I tried to use the stock return hardline from the OEM mechanical pump. This does not work, as it restricts the fuel too much and doesnít allow the regulator to set the pressure properly. I tapped this return line into the largest fitting on the stock tank.

I used the stock feed line, replacing the OEM rubber lines with fresh lines and clamps. Some of these were lines from the kit, some I picked up and the local OíShittyís parts store. You will be left with a third hardline that does not tie into the fuel system with the new pump. This goes to the emissions charcoal canister, which is not in my rig.

Make sure you still have a vent hose for the gas tank that works. I have not got mine dialed in fully at time of writing, and have to babysit the pump when filling up. No issues while running, including a 500mi round trip to a wedding and with 70 of those miles doing some hefty wheeling.

Once youíve got your pump installed, and lines routed, you will have to set up your Fuel Lab Pressure Regulator. The directions included with the pump are very good. One of the fuel hoses you have with your kit goes from the regulator to the carb. There is an inline fuel filter on it. Once you have everything hooked up, follow the fuel lab directions to set the pressure. I run mine at 1.5psi at idle and have no issues. There is a port on the intake for the new carb set up that is used to connect to the Boost Reference Port on the regulator. Set the pressure before connecting to the carb.

There is a very good bracket that mounts the regulator to the firewall with self tapping screws. As my rig has the emissions hardware removed, along with the battery relocated, I was able to use the mounting tab for the High Altitude Compensator for my regulator. This was close to the factory hardlines and made for a very clean installation.

The ZOR Mechanical Pump Block Off is a really nice piece of kit, and comes with new bolts to replace the studs. My studs were in very good shape, so I used a set of new washer, lock washer, and nuts to secure the block off.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2019, 06:36:35 PM »

OIL FEED/DRAIN:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/Acy2ykG

In your kit, you have two lines for oil feed and drain. You have a set of large AN Fittings for the drain, one for the oil pan and one for the turbo. There is a smaller line that is the feed. Also in the kit is a brass block with four threaded ports. There is a bolt that threads into this, and the oil feed restrictor valve. This part is where that thread sealing tape really sells itself. If you donít use it, youíre likely to experience a leak in this four way block. Iíll let you guess how I know that.

First step, get your oil pan set up for the drain. I ordered a ZOR oil pan with my kit, they drill and weld on the threaded bunge for the turbo drain. Drain the oil from the pan, pull the oil filter, and remove the oil pan bolts. Most likely, itís stuck on really solid. Pry it loose and wrestle it out. Itíll suck, but you can do it. No more beer until itís out. Once itís clear, scrape all the old RTV off the block and clean it up with brake clean. If you are modifying your own pan, clean it up really well and ensure any metal from drilling/welding is removed before reinstalling it.

I chose to put a gasket in, and RTVíd the shit out of it with the black stuff. Reinstall the pan, and bolt it back down. Congrats, youíre just that much closer to being boosted.

From here, I would put the manifold and turbo on, just hand tight. The drain line is very long, and ZOR recommends cutting it to fit your application. It is a stainless wrapped line, lots of videos on YouTube about how to cut and clean it properly. There are instructions on the ZOR Forums as well.

Getting the drain line into the AN fitting is tight, but thatís the goal. AN fittings are Ďself-sealingí and need to be tight to be so. I set up the pan side of the drain first, and then cut where I needed to. Make sure you have no kinks in the line, any restriction risks a blockage that could blow out your oil seals in the turbo.

Once itís cut, put the fitting together on both ends and leave it attached to the oil pan. The turbo side of the drain has a fitting attached to a bracket that is held on with two allen screws. There is a gasket that goes with the drain.

Oil feed line taps into the block where the oil pressure sensor is. I would advise leaving the oil filter off during installation of the feed line. I replaced my sensor, as it was leaking when I started. I would advise wrapping each fitting with thread tape. I started by putting the restrictor into the four way block, and the feed line into the opposite port.

The block off bolt can be traded out for a mechanical oil pressure gauge. Due to time and funding limits, I did not do that. You can also trade the stock sensor for that gauge. I have not seen anyone hook an electric sensor up yet, but Iím sure you can do that if you wish. As I did not have anything to replace the block off with, I put tape on the threads and put it back in.

I threaded the feed line into the block before putting the sensor back in. I found it easier to turn without the large sensor sticking out. You can thread each piece on, one at a time, starting with the restrictor, then the block, then the line, then the sensor. I found it easier to put everything but the sensor in the block, tighten it properly, and then put it all in the block at once. Make sure the restrictor valve can turn freely wherever it ends up sitting. You will have to adjust it once the motor is running. ZOR recommends a drip of oil per second, plus Ĺ turn open.

Next, I put in my new oil pressure sensor. It came with thread sealer on it, but guess what? I still taped that shit.

I advise routing the feed line away from the turbo as best you can. I chose to wrap mine behind the bracket for the washer fluid reservoir.

Ok, that covers the oil feed and return. Your turbo should have fittings installed, I chose to remove the drain side to make it easier to get the AN on. Your choice, whatever you think is easiest.

I would also advise installing an Oil Catch can to allow full crankcase ventilation. The boost forces more pressure through the whole motor. If you donít run a catch can, make sure you get a PCV that will handle boost pressures.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2019, 06:37:02 PM »

GAUGES:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/0daoTG1

I installed Autometer gauges. I got all analog, as I like that style and felt it fit with my rig better. I chose to install an A/F meter, a boost gauge and a tach. The directions provided with the gauges were very helpful and made installation pretty easy. The hardest part is routing the wiring behind the dash, as well as finding the best place to tie in to power to light them with the headlights. Iíve included some photos of how I chose to set up and install mine, more as inspiration than anything else.

I do strongly recommend the A/F meter, as tuning your carb is very hard to do without it. It is well worth the money. There are some digital gauges with good sensors available for less than $100.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2019, 06:37:30 PM »

TURBO AND CHARGE PIPES:

Photos: https://imgur.com/a/xccsjpc

Once youíve gotten everything else installed, the time comes for the whole reason youíve done this. The speed snail. The Shanghai Spooly. Well, since itís German, the Berlin Booster. The turbo.

As suggested in the exhaust section, I mounted my turbo onto the manifold with the manifold out of the engine bay. I also set up the oil feed line without the manifold or turbo connected. By the time youíre here, you should have a motor that can run. Make sure you have your oil feed set properly.

Yes, here for the third time, the coveted ZOR spec for oil feed:

One drip per second, plus Ĺ turn open from there.
I say coveted, because I had to email and ask for it. I could not find that information on any forum or instruction.

Back to the Frankfurt Forced Inductor.

I am going to assume you have, at this point, set the oil feed, and installed the turbo and manifold on the block. I would advise you to install the downpipe as well, because Iím sure you noticed how loud it was without the manifold on the head. Next, hook up the oil feed onto the turbo fitting. And guess what, amigo? You got it, tape that shit up.

Watch how you route the oil feed line. Remember the turbo gets very hot, so route it far away. Donít let it touch. Refer to the photos in the Oil Feed/Drain section.

Hook up the oil drain. I chose to remove the fitting from the turbo and attach it to the drain line prior to turbo installation. RTV the gasket that goes between the drain fitting and the turbo body, attach the fitting and tighten it down. This is where having a friend is really handy.

Start setting up your charge pipes and intake pipes. You have special clamps that hold up under boost, theyíre the very nice band clamps. The pipes are designed to be a bit too long, and can be cut to fit your application. At time of writing, I do not have an intercooler but plan to install one soon.

I used the two small ports on the intake manifold near the #1 cylinder to tie the blow off whistle and the boost gauge into. The yellow line that came on the blow off whistle tore very quickly. I replaced it with different line, and used a T-connector to tie that with the boost. See photos.

The intake setup my kit came with placed the air filter where the washer reservoir should go. Iím planning to redo this with a snorkeled setup in the future.

Now you have everything hooked up and ready to go, right?

Wrong. Didnít prime the turbo, did you?

Well, if you did, good job! If not, disconnect the distributor, and crank the motor for ten seconds. Let it rest for at least twenty seconds, and do another ten second crank. This turns the starter, turns the flywheel, turns the crank, turns the oil pump. Oil pump feeds oil up and into the turbo.

Next, hook the distributor up again, and fire the motor up. Let it warm up and slowly take the choke out. Then, look ahead to the tuning section.
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2019, 06:37:54 PM »

TUNING:

Iím going to work with the assumption that you have the motor running and timed as well as youíd like it to be. Iíll also assume that you have the carb dialed in enough to get it to idle and warm up enough to take the choke off completely.

The instructions available from ZORís website or forum for the Carb Conversion kit cover how to change idle and A/F mix. The summary is this: Thereís a screw on the throttle that adjusts idle speed, this is the screw I replaced with the allen head and spring. There is a small flat head screw at the bottom, that adjusts the A/F mix.

If your wideband is hooked up right, you turn the flathead to adjust the mix. Having a buddy is helpful here as well, since one can watch the gauge, and the other can adjust it. The target is 14.7 at idle. Once itís holding there, adjust your idle speed to your desired setting, check the A/F again. Adjust as needed, until itís idling at your speed of choice and holding 14.7

By now, the engine is warm and youíd have noticed any crazy issues. It shouldnít be smoking heavily, although some smoke off the turbo is normal until the shipping oil burns off, and the finish sets up. Slowly roll into the throttle and watch your gauges. Make sure itís not pinging or knocking, and ensure everything runs as it should. Once youíre satisfied, do a couple WOT pulls. A/F at WOT should be between 12 and 13. Roll slowly and smoothly to WOT. Do not dump or do any hard launches. According to my research, break the turbo in by making slow throttle adjustments and change the oil after 500 miles. After that, itís ready to go. Again, thatís my research, and I welcome any better information from those in the know.

That concludes what I can offer you. Your build will likely vary, but hopefully this gives you a lot of information to work with. The ZOR Forums have good information, as well as ZORís directions. The Four Wheeler network write up has a few good photos and information as well. There are a handful of YouTube videos about these kits and install. There are other threads on older forums that have information and photos as well.

Again, this is not a be-all, end-all guide to installation. My aim with this write up is to pass on the information I found in my installation, and add some more clear photos to the gray areas I had to investigate. Hopefully this helps you in your install, and we can all ride together, shiny, chrome, and boostiní  to Valhalla.
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easternzuk

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #8 on: October 06, 2019, 04:28:30 PM »

what are your thoughts on the added power of the turbo
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #9 on: October 08, 2019, 05:26:45 PM »

what are your thoughts on the added power of the turbo

It makes a huge difference. I live in Colorado, so my NA motor was rough to live with as a rule. Lots of steep hills, often had to take them in third. I was relegated to the right lane of the highway, and if I had to overtake, it was in fourth and it took awhile.

With the turbo, I can do plenty of hills in fourth with no lugging, at a good speed, without having to worry about choking out. I can overtake on level highway sections in fifth gear, in a reasonable time. I haven't done any scientific tuning on a Dyno, but as a seat of the pants study, it's fantastic.
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mkyhmltn

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #10 on: October 08, 2019, 06:35:03 PM »

What part of Colorado?
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #11 on: October 09, 2019, 04:18:01 PM »

I live in Colorado Springs, at about 6000ft
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mkyhmltn

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #12 on: October 10, 2019, 05:54:07 AM »

I'm right next door in Fountain
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gingersnap4x4

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #13 on: October 11, 2019, 07:47:28 PM »

Nice! Hello fellow Mountain lover. I think I recognize your Zuk. Are you going to boost yours?
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mkyhmltn

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Re: My ZOR Turbo Kit Install
« Reply #14 on: October 11, 2019, 08:13:58 PM »

Not at this time, it's a tbi 22r in it right now. gonna go propane then maybe a turbo down the road.
I
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